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Nancy B’s Science Club MoonScope™ and Star Gazer's Activity Journal
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Nancy B’s Science Club MoonScope™ and Star Gazer's Activity Journal

Ages 8+
The Big Idea

Grab your MoonScope and take a tour of the nighttime sky complete with visits to the stars, Saturn, Jupiter, and even the mountain ranges and craters on the moon! The Star Gazer’s Journal is packed with fun activities, like learning about the lunar phases, writing a moon myth, drawing your own man in the moon, and more!

Shh…They’re Learning!
  • Real-life journaling activities provide hands-on astronomy lessons
  • Encourages independent, parent-free learning
  • Perfect for budding astronomers
  • Supports STEM learning
Cut to the Chase
  • A telescope that gives a clear view of the nighttime sky
  • Includes moon filter, two eyepieces (to provide 18x and 90x magnification) and a built-in, pre-aligned finder scope with glow-in-the-dark ring to make it easy to use
  • 22-Page Star Gazers Journal includes stories about the moon plus fun observation activities
  • Lightweight and easy to assemble
  • LED light preserves night vision, and requires AA batteries, not included
Item#
Product
Qty
Price
5351
Nancy B’s Science Club MoonScope™ and Star Gazer's Activity Journal
$49.99
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REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
Nancy Bs Science Club MoonScope™ and Star Gazer's Activity Journal
 
3.4

(based on 14 reviews)

Ratings Distribution

  • 5 Stars

     

    (3)

  • 4 Stars

     

    (7)

  • 3 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 2 Stars

     

    (0)

  • 1 Stars

     

    (4)

71%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Educational (11)
  • Engaging (9)
  • Interactive (8)
  • Durable (6)
  • Lots of fun (6)

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Young children (6)
    • Entertainment (3)
    • Older children (3)
      • Reviewer Profile:
      • Education oriented (5), Parent of two or more children (4)
      • Was this a gift?:
      • No (8), Yes (6)

    Most Liked Positive Review

     

    LOVE this! And it is very well made

    We took this on a camping trip and the kids had a great time with it. Well made the the booklet just added to it being such a great find.

    We took this on a camping trip and the kids had a great time with it. Well made the the booklet just added to it being such a great find.

    VS

    Most Liked Negative Review

     

    Not Recommended - Parents should do some

    Two Quick Points:

    First, the best advice for first time telescope buyers is to attend a "star party" given by an astronomy club in your location. You'll be...Read complete review

    Two Quick Points:

    First, the best advice for first time telescope buyers is to attend a "star party" given by an astronomy club in your location. You'll be invited to look through members' telescopes and you'll come away with a first-hand appreciation of what to expect in the areas of capability, price and availability. You'll also get an idea of what your child might be able to handle.

    Second, even a bare-as-bone telescope designed for a beginner can be expensive. For example, what might be called the standard telescope for a moderately interested amateur astronomer, a six-inch Dobsonian reflector, will cost over $200. And for what some people might call high-end or professional telescopes the prices begin in the thousands.

    This may be why the time-honored advice given by experienced amateur astronomers to the parental question what should I get for a child just taking an interest in the sky has been a pair of binoculars and a good star map or beginner's book, such as "Turn Left at Orion". Most binoculars have acceptable optical performance, are relatively inexpensive and will still be of some use if the astronomy interest doesn't pan out.

    But practically all beginners want a bona fide telescope, an instrument that will "really show something". So there is a market for small telescopes aimed at beginners and children. Frankly, most if not all of them will show lunar craters, Jupiter's four Galilean moons and Jupiter's two prominent cloud bands on a good night. While all of these telescopes make compromises of some sort to be affordable, but all should meet some basic requirements and of course some will be better at that than others.

    I can't recommend Educational Insights Nancy B'S Science Club Moonscope because there are a number of beginner telescopes roughly in the same price range, for example Celestron's 70mm Travel Scope or their Cometron FirstScope that have better fundamentals and will perform better.

    The Moonscope has a clear aperture of 45mm (the diameter of its lens. Both of the Celestron units are larger in aperture. They will resolve details more clearly and capture more light. Both should be easier to use and will accept some standard accessories if a child's astronomy interest grows.

    Here are some basic requirements that any telescope should meet:

    1. A TELESCOPE SHOULD BE RIGIDLY MOUNTED. The legs of the Moonscope are plastic and will easily transfer vibrations should they or the surface on which the scope is set up is bumped. Also because the Moonscope and its tripod are extremely light a good breeze will give it the shakes. Few things are more aggravating than trying to observe something through a vibrating telescope. Having to "fight the telescope" could really deaden a child's interest. All beginners telescopes have this problem, but it's especially obvious with the Moonscope due to its construction.

    2. A FINDER SCOPE SHOULD CLEARLY SHOW AND HELP PINPOINT A TARGET. Like the cross hairs on a rifle, a telescope finder helps you point the more powerful main scope at a target which would be difficult or impossible to center using the main scope alone. Usually, they are adjustable, but the finder on the Moonscope is not. It's a pre-aligned plastic tube that's partially closed at one end. Unfortunately, it's next to useless. It totally distorts the image of the Moon and using it to point the Moonscope at Jupiter, a really bright star-like object, was just about impossible. I gave up and pointed the telescope by sighting up the main tube – a skill picked up over the years. Most beginner scopes include a small telescopic finder and an adequate finder should be considered a necessity if a child is to use the telescope.

    3. A TELESCOPE SHOULD HAVE GOOD OPTICS. The Moonscope comes with two eyepieces, a 20mm and a 4mm. The view through the 20mm is acceptable, but the image produced by a binocular of comparable magnification is significantly sharper. When compared to the image produced by a slightly larger, but more expensive telescope with more expensive eyepieces, the difference is clearly obvious.

    The 4mm eyepiece indicated as giving a magnification of 90 is a bit of a disaster. First the power is at the limit recommended for a scope of this size, even with perfect optics and great seeing conditions. The views that one would normally get at this power, even with expensive equipment, will be disappointing – a bit dark and "mushy". But the 4mm eyepiece is far from being optically perfect. Move the object you're viewing to the periphery of the field of view and it turns into a "blob". After using the 4mm a few times, I put it permanently in my pocket.

    Also eyepieces for modern astronomical telescopes come in two standard diameters, 1.25 and 2 inches. The Moonscope eyepieces are smaller and non-standard. You have only the two eyepieces that come with the Moonscope. Starter scopes, such as those mentioned above, use standard eyepieces so other eyepieces with different magnifications or fields of view (and things like filters which fit them) can be added.

    A NITPICK. The Moonscope comes with a permanently attached star diagonal (the device that bends the light path 90 degrees and accepts the eyepieces). A diagonal presents a "mirror" image of what you're viewing. North is north, south is south, but east and west are reversed. This is mentioned in the activity journal that comes with the Moonscope. However, the lunar chart in the activity journal shows the Moon in its normal orientation. This could be confusing for a youngster trying to navigate the lunar surface and identify its features.

    Sparking a child's interest in astronomy is a laudable goal. It can lead to a lifetime of interest, activity or in some cases, even a profession. Taking a bit of care with regard to the tools a child will use to explore the sky for the first time can make all the difference.

    Reviewed by 14 customers

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    1.0

    Looks fab, doesen't work, don't buy

    By NZ mother

    from New Zealand

    About Me Parent Of Two Or More Children

    Pros

      Cons

        Best Uses

          Comments about Nancy Bs Science Club MoonScope™ and Star Gazer's Activity Journal:

          This was a gift for my daughter's 8th birthday and she was soooo excited. We can't get it to work despite having the biggest moon in 20 years this week in New Zealand. The packaging is great, it looks amazing, but unfortuantely does not live up to expectations. I would not recomend it to anyone - my daughter is disillusioned and I'm cross I got it shipped from the USA at great cost.

          • Was this a gift?:
          • Yes

          Comment on this review

           
          5.0

          Great Kid's First Moon Scope

          By NIAAS

          from Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

          About Me Amateur Astronomer, Parent Of Two Or More Children, Working Parent

          Pros

          • Durable
          • Educational
          • Engaging
          • Interactive
          • Lots of Fun

          Cons

          • 4mm Eyepiece

          Best Uses

          • Moon
          • Young Children

          Comments about Nancy Bs Science Club MoonScope™ and Star Gazer's Activity Journal:

          This product comes in a well-presented outer box. The product consists of a small telescope, with a tripod and two eyepieces. A moon filter is also provided as a nice extra touch.

          It is obvious that a lot of thought has been put into the whole package. There are good instructions supplied, and the activity journal is very good, with lots of interesting activities and information. The telescope has several features which one would not expect on a product of this size.

          The telescope is very well made, and nicely decorated. A dust cover for the main lens is attached to the telescope by a piece of string so that it does not get lost. The telescope lens appears to be made of glass, usually the lens on a telescope of this size would be plastic. The focuser is very smooth and the diagonal, into which the eyepieces fit, is very clear, and again, appears to be made of glass. The finder scope was just about ok to use to find the Moon, but was not very successful on the planet Jupiter.

          The table-top tripod, although quite light, is firm enough to hold the telescope without too much vibration. Attaching the telescope to the mount was very easy, and movement, both up and down, and side to side, was very smooth. I was a bit disappointed that there was no battery supplied for the little LED light. A little tray which could be attached to the tripod would make it a little firmer, and would also be useful for storing eyepieces when not in use.

          The eyepieces supplied with the telescope were a little disappointing. The 20mm was ok, providing roughly 18 times magnification. It took the Moon approximately 6 minutes to cross the field of view, so this allowed a good period of time to look at the Moon without having to move the telescope. But the 4mm eyepiece was very poor, difficult to focus for an adult, never mind a child. I think an eyepiece of around 8mm, giving 45 times magnification, would be much better. The Moon filter worked quite well in the 20mm eyepiece.

          The telescope was used to observe a 6 day old Moon. Using the 20mm eyepiece, the shadows within the major craters were well-defined and sharp. The mountainous areas were also well –defined, and very clearly seen. Some larger rilles were also seen. Unfortunately, this definition and clarity was lost with the 4mm eyepiece. Focus was difficult to achieve, and the moon was quite dark. The filter, used with the 20mm eyepiece, gave a nice soft hue to the lunar surface, and it would be of value when the Moon is further into its cycle, and therefore brighter.
          I also observed the planet Jupiter. In the 20mm eyepiece, the moons were just visible, and faint markings could be seen on the planet. Again, the 4mm eyepiece showed no improvement. To be fair, the planet was quite low, and just above a neighbour's house, but I would have expected to see the moons a lot better, even in the 20mm.

          In summary, this is a fairly good product when compared to others of a similar price and size. It was well-presented, and easy to use. An 8mm eyepiece, instead of the 4mm, would be an improvement, and perhaps the finder scope could use a little more thought.

          Stevie Beasant (NIAAS Chairman)14th April 2014
          Northern Ireland Amateur Astronomy Society

          • Was this a gift?:
          • Yes

          Comment on this review

           
          1.0

          Horrible telescope

          By Jill

          from stoystown, pa

          About Me Parent Of Two Or More Children, Stay At Home Parent

          Pros

            Cons

            • Doesn't work AT ALL

            Best Uses

              Comments about Nancy Bs Science Club MoonScope™ and Star Gazer's Activity Journal:

              I bought this as a gift for my son about 2 months ago and we have not been able to see ANYTHING through it...not even a tree..it doesn't focus at all..just blur during the daytime and black at night. My son was so excited about this and it is a huge disappointment. I bought this because of the good reviews, but I don't agree with them at all.

              • Was this a gift?:
              • No

              Comment on this review

               
              1.0

              It does not work!!!!

              By Jan

              from El Paso, Texas

              About Me Grandparent

              Pros

              • No Pros

              Cons

              • DOES NOT WORK

              Best Uses

              • Frustration

              Comments about Nancy Bs Science Club MoonScope™ and Star Gazer's Activity Journal:

              I tried several times to make the thing work but it could not even focus in on a full moon in a desert sky, much less a star(s).

              • Was this a gift?:
              • No

              Comment on this review

               
              4.0

              Great first telescope

              By Patti S.

              from Los Angeles, CA

              About Me Teacher

              Pros

              • Educational
              • Engaging
              • Interactive

              Cons

                Best Uses

                • Outdoor

                Comments about Nancy Bs Science Club MoonScope™ and Star Gazer's Activity Journal:

                This telescope is super user friendly for young kids. It is light-weight and easy to maneuver. The tripod is simple to adjust for any tabletop. While you can see clearly through the telescope, the only con is the magnification. The lens doesn't magnify that well.
                All in all, the telescope is very engaging to get young kids excited about studying the moon.

                • Was this a gift?:
                • No

                Comment on this review

                 
                5.0

                Perfect for young children

                By Mike

                from Pittsburgh, PA

                About Me Amateur Astronomer, First Time Parent

                Pros

                • Durable
                • Educational
                • Engaging
                • Interactive
                • Lots of Fun

                Cons

                  Best Uses

                  • Young Children

                  Comments about Nancy Bs Science Club MoonScope™ and Star Gazer's Activity Journal:

                  To preface my review, let me state that I'm an amateur astronomer and astro-photographer and belong to a local astronomy club that is heavily involved in public outreach events. The single most common question I am asked by parents is "What kind of telescope should I buy my child?"

                  There are lots of options out there, ranging from cheaply made imports you can get at any department store to high quality instruments that can easily cost $500. Most are simple to operate but suffer from one glaring problem; they're not designed with children in mind. This telescope clearly has.

                  It's made mostly of plastic, which keeps weight down without sacrificing strength, and has a wonderfully compact design. I have a three year old daughter that was easily able to carry it out of the house to our front yard.

                  The optical design of the telescope is what might be called a rich field refractor. What that means effectively is the magnification is kept relatively low (usually in the 10x-40x range), but in exchange you typically get brighter views through the eyepiece and have a larger field of view. Many beginner telescopes advertised in stores brag about a magnification of anywhere from 500x to 750x. These magnifications are all but useless on small telescopes, as they result in dim views and are difficult to actually find anything in the sky.

                  Additionally, the telescope incorporates two valuable features that aren't always found on beginner telescopes; a non-magnifying finder scope and a diagonal. The finder scope is a simple plastic tube with cross hairs at the end that makes aiming the telescope a breeze. The diagonal is a small mirror that reflects the light at a 90 degree angle from the tube. This allows a much more comfortable viewing position while seated, instead of having to lie down or crane your neck at odd angles. Best of all, they're permanently affixed so they can't be lost.

                  The telescope comes with two interchangeable eyepieces, 20mm and 4mm. The 20mm gives nice wide field views while the 4mm lets you crank up the magnification. The quality of the image was more than acceptable with both eyepieces. In my experience, the 20mm is preferable for kids looking at the moon. The 4mm tended to have the moon slide out of the field of view too quickly, requiring frequent re-aiming. However, the 4mm was very well suited to daytime observing of terrestrial subjects, like birds in trees or flowers down the street.

                  Two final features that I'd like to mention are the built in LED light and the telescope lens cap. The LED light is perfect for helping kids find their way around in the dark and reading the activity book. This is especially important when you consider that they may be doing this for the first time! The lens cap is smartly connected to the telescope tube with a string to prevent it from getting lost in the dark or during transport.

                  One thing that came up occasionally was a request to view Jupiter, Saturn, or another galaxy. Sadly, this telescope just isn't designed for that. Jupiter and Saturn would show up as tiny, featureless disks. Galaxies are a flat out impossibility. They're simply too small and faint to be seen by a telescope of this size. But please don't read this as a complaint; I just want to prevent anyone from having unrealistic expectations.

                  Overall, I am extremely happy and very impressed with this telescope and have already recommended it to several people with small children. The suggested age is 8 years and up, but with proper supervision my 3 year old was using it without problems. And after teaching her how to use it, she asks me almost every night if we can go look at the moon.

                  • Was this a gift?:
                  • Yes

                  Comment on this review

                   
                  1.0

                  Not Recommended - Parents should do some

                  By John C.

                  from Pittsburgh PA

                  About Me Collector, Grandparent, Parent Of Two Or More Children

                  Pros

                  • Cute
                  • Educational

                  Cons

                  • Flimsy
                  • Poor Design

                  Best Uses

                    Comments about Nancy Bs Science Club MoonScope™ and Star Gazer's Activity Journal:

                    Two Quick Points:

                    First, the best advice for first time telescope buyers is to attend a "star party" given by an astronomy club in your location. You'll be invited to look through members' telescopes and you'll come away with a first-hand appreciation of what to expect in the areas of capability, price and availability. You'll also get an idea of what your child might be able to handle.

                    Second, even a bare-as-bone telescope designed for a beginner can be expensive. For example, what might be called the standard telescope for a moderately interested amateur astronomer, a six-inch Dobsonian reflector, will cost over $200. And for what some people might call high-end or professional telescopes the prices begin in the thousands.

                    This may be why the time-honored advice given by experienced amateur astronomers to the parental question what should I get for a child just taking an interest in the sky has been a pair of binoculars and a good star map or beginner's book, such as "Turn Left at Orion". Most binoculars have acceptable optical performance, are relatively inexpensive and will still be of some use if the astronomy interest doesn't pan out.

                    But practically all beginners want a bona fide telescope, an instrument that will "really show something". So there is a market for small telescopes aimed at beginners and children. Frankly, most if not all of them will show lunar craters, Jupiter's four Galilean moons and Jupiter's two prominent cloud bands on a good night. While all of these telescopes make compromises of some sort to be affordable, but all should meet some basic requirements and of course some will be better at that than others.

                    I can't recommend Educational Insights Nancy B'S Science Club Moonscope because there are a number of beginner telescopes roughly in the same price range, for example Celestron's 70mm Travel Scope or their Cometron FirstScope that have better fundamentals and will perform better.

                    The Moonscope has a clear aperture of 45mm (the diameter of its lens. Both of the Celestron units are larger in aperture. They will resolve details more clearly and capture more light. Both should be easier to use and will accept some standard accessories if a child's astronomy interest grows.

                    Here are some basic requirements that any telescope should meet:

                    1. A TELESCOPE SHOULD BE RIGIDLY MOUNTED. The legs of the Moonscope are plastic and will easily transfer vibrations should they or the surface on which the scope is set up is bumped. Also because the Moonscope and its tripod are extremely light a good breeze will give it the shakes. Few things are more aggravating than trying to observe something through a vibrating telescope. Having to "fight the telescope" could really deaden a child's interest. All beginners telescopes have this problem, but it's especially obvious with the Moonscope due to its construction.

                    2. A FINDER SCOPE SHOULD CLEARLY SHOW AND HELP PINPOINT A TARGET. Like the cross hairs on a rifle, a telescope finder helps you point the more powerful main scope at a target which would be difficult or impossible to center using the main scope alone. Usually, they are adjustable, but the finder on the Moonscope is not. It's a pre-aligned plastic tube that's partially closed at one end. Unfortunately, it's next to useless. It totally distorts the image of the Moon and using it to point the Moonscope at Jupiter, a really bright star-like object, was just about impossible. I gave up and pointed the telescope by sighting up the main tube – a skill picked up over the years. Most beginner scopes include a small telescopic finder and an adequate finder should be considered a necessity if a child is to use the telescope.

                    3. A TELESCOPE SHOULD HAVE GOOD OPTICS. The Moonscope comes with two eyepieces, a 20mm and a 4mm. The view through the 20mm is acceptable, but the image produced by a binocular of comparable magnification is significantly sharper. When compared to the image produced by a slightly larger, but more expensive telescope with more expensive eyepieces, the difference is clearly obvious.

                    The 4mm eyepiece indicated as giving a magnification of 90 is a bit of a disaster. First the power is at the limit recommended for a scope of this size, even with perfect optics and great seeing conditions. The views that one would normally get at this power, even with expensive equipment, will be disappointing – a bit dark and "mushy". But the 4mm eyepiece is far from being optically perfect. Move the object you're viewing to the periphery of the field of view and it turns into a "blob". After using the 4mm a few times, I put it permanently in my pocket.

                    Also eyepieces for modern astronomical telescopes come in two standard diameters, 1.25 and 2 inches. The Moonscope eyepieces are smaller and non-standard. You have only the two eyepieces that come with the Moonscope. Starter scopes, such as those mentioned above, use standard eyepieces so other eyepieces with different magnifications or fields of view (and things like filters which fit them) can be added.

                    A NITPICK. The Moonscope comes with a permanently attached star diagonal (the device that bends the light path 90 degrees and accepts the eyepieces). A diagonal presents a "mirror" image of what you're viewing. North is north, south is south, but east and west are reversed. This is mentioned in the activity journal that comes with the Moonscope. However, the lunar chart in the activity journal shows the Moon in its normal orientation. This could be confusing for a youngster trying to navigate the lunar surface and identify its features.

                    Sparking a child's interest in astronomy is a laudable goal. It can lead to a lifetime of interest, activity or in some cases, even a profession. Taking a bit of care with regard to the tools a child will use to explore the sky for the first time can make all the difference.

                    • Was this a gift?:
                    • No

                    Comment on this review

                     
                    4.0

                    Good starter scope for kids.

                    By Concerned Consumer

                    from California

                    About Me Education Oriented

                    Pros

                    • Book Is Decent Intro To T
                    • Durable
                    • Easy To Set Up And Use
                    • Educational
                    • Engaging
                    • Good For Its Audience
                    • Interactive

                    Cons

                      Best Uses

                      • Entertainment
                      • Moon-gazing
                      • Nature Watching
                      • Young Children

                      Comments about Nancy Bs Science Club MoonScope™ and Star Gazer's Activity Journal:

                      In a nutshell, this is a good kid's scope for moon-gazing and nature watching.

                      To be honest, when I first opened the box and saw all the plastic parts, I expected some easily broken junk. But I was pleasantly surprised by the quality of this thing. The plastic is of a strong, robust type, and can handle all but the most brutal kids. The design is well thought out, with most assembly already done so that parts don't get lost, or having the less mechanically-inclined get confused trying to figure out what-goes-where. Additionally, the finder scope is built-in and already aligned (that's good because lots of people can't figure out how to align them).

                      The image quality is pretty good. Although some color fringing is present around the edges of bright objects, the image is pretty sharp and gives plenty of detail. The moon showed great contrast, and Jupiter resolved into a neat little ball with 4 moons easily seen around it. The double star system Alcor and Mizar were also easily split into two.

                      It comes with 2 eyepieces that give just the right amount of magnification for a scope this size (lots of companies market scopes with uselessly high powers that just result in dim, fuzzy blobs). The eyepieces also come with dust covers; a nice touch that even some of my $150 eyepieces don't have. The focuser and front lens also have dust covers.

                      A nice accessory is the moon filter to dim the view a bit, and I found it improved the view by removing the color fringing around bright objects.

                      It comes with a very simple and brief book to teach kids about using the scope and some basic lunar facts. Overall it's a good introduction to the moon, but I feel a few pages could have been devoted to some very basic lunar geology, like how the moon formed or what created the craters. Although it's a moon scope, a page or two on bird and animal watching would have been nice, helping the kids to think about what the creatures might be doing (foraging? nest-building?).

                      The only negatives I found where very minor. The front lens cover flaps in a very light breeze, shaking the scope and making it hard to see. Parents will have to decide if they want to cut the string holding it on the scope, but then you risk your kid losing it. Furthermore, the finder scope has a small diameter and very thick crosshairs, which obscured Jupiter and the stars, making it hard to tell if they were centered in the main scope. I ended up sighting along the body of the main scope to find them.

                      Overall I think this is a great first scope to get your kid into astronomy, and I sincerely recommend it.

                      • Was this a gift?:
                      • No

                      Comment on this review

                       
                      4.0

                      Good intro to astronomy for kids

                      By Neil the Detail Oriented

                      from Palos Verdes, CA

                      About Me Education Oriented

                      Pros

                      • Educational
                      • Engaging
                      • Portable

                      Cons

                      • LIGHTWEIGHT

                      Best Uses

                      • Young Children

                      Comments about Nancy Bs Science Club MoonScope™ and Star Gazer's Activity Journal:

                      This telescope is a good way to introduce kids to astronomy. It is very easy to set up and use, the materials are engaging, and it is fun-colored for kids although geared more for girls in my opinion. The optics are very good for a kid's telescope. We were able to see the moon in great detail and the scope helped guide us to it. Due to weather we were not able to see any planets but We used it in daylight for spotting and it worked pretty well there also. Note that for daytime use, don't look through glass windows as they will detract from the clarity. The LED light is a nice addition to the kit as it helps to read the book in the dark and it is physically attached so it can't be lost. It is compact and easy enough to tote around to a friend's house or out in the field. A small bag for the eye pieces and covers that clips to the base would be a nice feature.

                      But, this is not a professional scope and is clearly intended for kids. While easy to set up, it is very lightweight and easily moved so as to lose what you were looking at. It needs a stable surface and should be used where there is no wind, and possibly with some stabilization like a book, to minimize vibrations. The scope has a limited vertical pitch so When objects are high in the sky, you will have to angle the base somehow to see them. Last night the moon was nearly overhead so we tilted the base on two of its feet to angle the scope enough. We saw the moon fine but it was not a perfect setup. As noted above, the finder scope helped us find the moon fairly well but it is of limited use for smaller objects. Being clear plastic, light from the object or from the general area reflects around inside the scope making it hard to pinpoint an object.

                      Overall it is a good telescope for kids to introduce them to astronomy and exploring the skies. It also gives the family something to do together instead of TV or iPads.

                      Disclsoure: Our scope was provided to us in exchange for a review.

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                      • Yes

                      Comment on this review

                       
                      4.0

                      Might be a nice gift for your kid

                      By M. Raşid Tuğral

                      from Turkiye

                      About Me Education Oriented

                      Pros

                      • Educational
                      • Engaging
                      • Interactive
                      • Lots of Fun

                      Cons

                      • Flimsy
                      • Poor Design

                      Best Uses

                      • Entertainment
                      • Older Children
                      • Special Needs
                      • Travel
                      • Young Children

                      Comments about Nancy Bs Science Club MoonScope™ and Star Gazer's Activity Journal:

                      The scope's optical quality is quite good, I haven't seen any disturbing chromatic aberration.However, the indicated magnification rates does not seem so correct. With 4mm lens I could see something like 60x at most. Lens qualities are quite ok but the field of view of the oculars might be better if they were a little wider. With this telescope you can be able to see moon's crater, four moons of Jupiter, crescent shape of Venus or rings of Saturn very clearly but it may be a little difficult to adjust the telescope and get them in view (moon is exception).

                      The tripod seems so light, with a little shake the field of view immediately slides. You need to be extra careful no to touch the telescope and this may be a little difficult for children who are newbie in observing the nightsky. Therefore binoculars might be better for them. However, the red light located under the scope is really a good idea and it can be very useful under the dark skies in order to not disturb the night adaptation of the eyes.

                      It is a good idea to use a finderscope without magnification but it would be better if the tube was longer and the pointing cross might be thinner especially for the planets so that you can align the telescope acurately.

                      The Activity Journal is well written and I really appreciated its style and the pictures, illustrations, tables etc. inside. If you are a little isolated from astronomy even you can benefit from it too.

                      The name of the product is Moonscope so if your only purpose is to observe the moon this might be a nice choice for your kid. It can be a little challanging for the planets and other stuffs.

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                      • Yes

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                      Nancy B’s Science Club Microscope and Activity Journal
                      Ages 8+
                      $39.99
                      Nancy B’s Science Club AquaScope™ and Underwater Wonders Activity Journal
                      Ages 8+
                      $39.99
                      Nancy B’s Science Club Binoculars and Wildlife Activity Journal
                      Ages 8+
                      $16.99
                      Nancy B’s Science Club Crime Solver Scope and Forensic Activity Journal
                      Ages 8+
                      $16.99